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Page 1
Annual Report 2003
Industry-University Cooperative Research Program
“We must move discoveries from
the bench to the public domain
more effectively. And we must hand
them off more quickly to end-users,
whether they are first responders
in a crisis, farmers, health care
professionals, social workers, or
teachers.”
-Robert C. Dynes
University of California President
www.ucdiscoverygrant.org

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Since 1996, the University of California has been building a capacity for maximizing
the economic impact of its research and education programs through the Industry-
University Cooperative Research Program (IUCRP) and its UC Discovery Grants.
It is a rich and rare find in an academic environment – an initiative fostering public-
private relationships that are both strategically targeted and flexible enough to
promote jointly funded research across the broad industry-university interface. IUCRP
partnerships with California businesses advance meritorious research programs that
would be considered too high risk or of too broad scope for discipline-limited federal
funding priorities. They fuel entrepreneurism while simultaneously promoting academic
excellence.
This year’s report focuses on this unique California capacity and what it is contributing
to the California economy at a time when the state needs it most. California has lost
more than 100,000 high-paying technology jobs since 2001 and industry has undergone
dramatic restructuring in a struggle to return to profitability. Both public and privately
held biotech firms have suffered more than two years of declining valuations and under-
investment. Society is confronting new threats and homeland security has become both
a top priority and a budgetary burden. In times like these, the mission and goals of the
IUCRP become essential.
Through a mechanism as simple as matching grants, the IUCRP has been bridging the
gap between UC and California companies. The impact is clear – R&D enhancement
in California’s core technology industries, advancing the scientific knowledge base,
capital formation, boosting survival rates in a tough economic climate, creating new
jobs and educating the R&D workforce. The IUCRP has the data to back this up and a
new organization to expand the impact going forward.
The short range goal is to promote, immediately, more strategically focused and robust
partnership building. A team of professionals with both basic research and business
development experience provide reconnaissance, training a spotlight on opportunities
that California can uniquely address by joint industry-UC effort. The medium range
goal is to define statewide networks of expertise that enable planning at a different
scale and level of complexity. A California Homeland Security Atlas supports a case
study on how such networks may address challenging technological problems requiring
rapid application paths and the best science.
With this report, we are moving into a new phase of development – and impact for
California.
Dr. Susanne Huttner
Executive Director
Associate Vice Provost for Research
Office of the President
Restarting the California Economy

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Table of Contents
The IUCRP Approach
3
Benefits to Industry Partners
4
Bringing UC’s Research Strength into Action
6
Impact
7
Success Stories:
Fighting Malaria
9
Gaining the Competitive Edge
10
The Critical Ten Percent
11
Impact on California
12
Success Stories:
Fertile Ground for California Entrepreneurs
14
Student Entrepreneurs
15
Financial Report
17
Appendix A: Management and
Governance
20
Appendix B: Participating
Sponsor Companies
26
Appendix C: Participating Campus Departments,
National Labs and Centers
36
Appendix D: Private Sponsor and PI - Co-PI Surveys
38

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Page 3
The IUCRP Approach
The Industry-University Cooperative Research Program’s (IUCRP) approach is driven by a set
of basic principles and goals. Primary among them is intensifying the role of the University in
service to the people of the State of California and its economy. Innovation is a proven driver.
The IUCRP is expanding the substrate on which innovation occurs, emphasizing the essential
source -- cumulative problem solving and research advances through broad interactions.
The IUCRP is helping California maximize its innovation edge by:
expanding industry access to the UC
community’s ability to solve discrete practical
problems;
leveraging Industry, State, and Federal
investments in R&D;
building a balanced science and technology
portfolio across a broad array of R&D-intensive
industries (i.e., biotechnology, communications
and networking, digital media, electronics
manufacturing, information technology for life
sciences, and microelectronics);
exposing problems of interest to many
companies;
enabling research contributions from
more than one field to drive multiple
industry sectors;
promoting high risk/high impact research
with rigorous quality controls;
emphasizing the full spectrum of
contribution vectors, including research,
expert consultation, creating R&D
leaders, workforce development, and
other aspects of technology transfer
focusing on major California problems,
including health, clean air and water,
energy, manufacturing, and public safety.
2.
Federal agency peer reviews
and awards research funding
Traditional University-Federal government funding cycle
University Investigator writes a basic
research proposal
University Investigator/Campus:
• performs research
• places new knowledge
in the public domain
• produces new scientists
and engineers
• may create inventions,
disclosures, and seek licensees
1.
3.
The IUCRP approach:
University-Federal government - R&D firm cycle
UC Investigator writes a
basic research proposal
2.
Federal agency peer reviews and
awards research funding
3.
UC Investigator and California
R&D firm write a UC Discovery
Grant basic research proposal
4.
IUCRP peer reviews and both IUCRP
and R&D firm award research funding
to UC Investigator
R&D firm:
• leverages R&D funding
• accesses UC talent and facilities
• expands R&D
• accesses IP rights
• attracts new investment
UC Investigator/Campus:
• performs research
• places new knowledge in the public domain
• consults with company
• negotiates IP rights with R&D firm
• produces new scientists and engineers
5.
1.
2.

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Benefits to Industry Partners
The participating firms reflect a broad cross
section of California’s R&D-intensive economy
and include entrepreneurial efforts that are
pioneering entirely new markets and industrial
sectors. They include both industry leaders,
such as Intel and Chiron, and promising start
up firms like ThinKOM Solutions, Pacific Fuel
Cell Corp., and ImmvaRx (see Appendix A for
full list of participating companies and table
this page, for a list of start up companies that
have sponsored UC Discovery Grants.
By a number of measures, the companies
that are partnering with UC researchers
through the IUCRP represent real economic
development power, both as well established
contributors to the California economy
and as the sources of important emerging
contributions. Many are cited as leaders
in industry analyses published by regional
and national business media, including
Business Week’s IT 100, Forbes 200 Best Small
Businesses, and the regional lists of the San
Francisco Chronicle, San Jose Mercury News,
and Los Angeles Times (see table, this page).
Who are the IUCRP’s Industry Partners?
The IUCRP’s UC Discovery Grants have
engaged 353 companies in more than 595
research partnerships, to date. It is in large
part through the R&D programs of these
companies that benefits to California flow.
Those benefits are described in the Impact
section of this report.
In addition to its UC Discovery Grants, the
IUCRP also includes the MICRO program and
the grants and fellowships it has awarded
since fiscal year 1998-1999. The MICRO
program was launched in 1981 and is
managed in the Office of Research (not in
the IUCRP headquarters) with a different
management and governance approach.
This report includes MICRO budgetary
and investment information (e.g. in the
Investment chart, below and in the Financial
Report section), as well as a list of sponsor
companies, but MICRO impact information
was not available.
UC Discovery Grant Private Sponsors
By Size at First Proposal, and Field of Research
Field
Total Employment
Worldwide
Biotech
High Tech Grand Total
Tiny
31
20
51
0-10 (subsidiaries)
4
8
12
11-50
42
30
72
51-500
1
9
10
501-1,000
45
25
71
More than 1,000
37
100
137
Grand Total
161
192
353
UC Discovery Grant Private Sponsors
By Age at First Proposal, and Field of Research
Field
Age
Biotech
High Tech
Grand Total
< 1 year
16
21
37
1-5 years
47
36
83
5-10 years
41
28
69
> 10 years
57
107
164
Grand Total
161
192
353
AnalgesiX, Inc.
Clinical Micro Sensors, Inc.
(Now Motorola)
DyNAmix (now Dynavax)
Embi Tec
EpiGenX Pharmaceuticals
Glumetric
ImmvaRx
Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems
KineMed, LLC
Kinexis, Inc.
Maxwell Sensors Inc.
Myelos Neurosciences Corp.
Nereus Pharmaceuticals, Inc
Pacific Fuel Cell Corp.
Pharmix Corporation
Pivotal Machines, Inc
Rainbow Communications, Inc.
Raven Biotechnologies, Inc.
Remergent, Inc.
Salmedix Inc
TerraGenomics
ThinKom Solutions, Inc.
Start Up Sponsor Firms
UC Discovery Grant Sponsors Ranked in
Major Regional and National Publications
San Francisco Chronicle 200 28 firms (23 of top 100)
(May 2003)
San Jose Mercury News 16 firms (9 of top 50)
Silicon Valley 150 (April 15, 2003)
Los Angeles Times 100 8 firms (6 of top 50)
(February 2003)
Business Week IT 100 13 firms
Forbes 200 Best Small Businesses 2 firms
(May 23, 2003)
Total Number of UCDG Sponsors 47 firms

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Each year, about half of the companies
co-sponsoring new grants are participating
in the program for the first time.
According to preliminary results from a
recent survey conducted by the IUCRP:
• 40% of the responding partner
companies (29) had not sponsored
research at UC before engaging in an
IUCRP matching grant;
• 86% (63) report that the IUCRP
matching grants increased their access
to UC faculty and students;
• 92% (67) say they would invest, again.
As described in the Impact section, below,
participation enables firms to undertake
something they could not do in-house by
leveraging their limited R&D funds, enabling
them to explore problems too high risk for
internal investment, and giving them access
to expertise and infrastructure they didn’t
have.
Their combined investments in 1,189 IUCRP
research projects currently amount to more
than $147.5 million dollars (including MICRO
grants), primarily in cash – a strong testament
to the value of partnering with UC. Their
Why do Industry Partners Invest?
contributions strongly leverage $112 million
in State contributions to the IUCRP and are
further leveraged by federal investments
in UC researchers and laboratories. A key
reason they all invest? Innovation fuels
competitiveness and competitiveness fuels
company growth.
IUCRP Investment Fund Growth through FY 02-03

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Bringing UC’s Research Strengths into Action
The UC Discovery Grant partner companies
have engaged more than 550 UC faculty and
1,300 students (to date) in research projects
that are directly relevant to industry R&D
problems and the California economy. The
IUCRP expert peer review process ensures
that the research plans and research teams
are of the highest quality and the budgets
are reasonable. This approach ensures that
only the best research projects are advanced
for joint funding, substantially increasing the
probability of success.
The IUCRP is having measureable impact
on the UC research community. It is
helping faculty and students build effective
relationships with California companies and it
is steadily expanding the number and breadth
of UC participants.
As more and more researchers and companies
participate, networks of expertise form and
create a powerful new tool for economic
development. The IUCRP has built new
reconnaissance and surveillance mechanisms
that are actively defining emerging networks,
promoting communication and interaction,
and creating a platform for strategic R&D
planning.
The greatest value stems from engaging the
university’s capacity for mounting broadly
multidisciplinary research efforts. Unlike
federal funding agencies, the IUCRP funding
has no walls between its major target fields
in science and engineering. The IUCRP
promotes cross-cutting research efforts,
partnering with major research centers at
the campuses and National Laboratories,
including the four California Institutes for
Science and Innovation. This enables IUCRP
participants to address difficult technology
challenges, such as nanotechnology and
embedded systems.
(n=162 in preliminary sample)
• more than 36% (59) of respondents had not participated in industry sponsored
research before they received an IUCRP matching grant;
• 70% (112) report that their participation lead to a longer term relationship with
sponsor companies;
• 84% (132) say their experience encouraged them to build research relationships
with other companies;
• 84% (132) say that their experience with a IUCRP matching grant lead them to
focus more effort in the field of research than previously;
• 98% (157) said they would participate in IUCRP matching grants, again.
Preliminary survey results: UC Investigators

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Impact
Impact on Sponsor Companies
R&D Enhancement
IUCRP sponsor firms participate for a wide
variety of reasons, but nearly all do it so
that they can undertake something that
they could not undertake in-house. The
preliminary survey results presented in the
box illustrate the critical barriers to R&D
that the IUCRP helps California companies
overcome – including inadequacies in
expertise and research infrastructure that
require substantially greater investment to
correct in-house.
What they get out of the sponsored projects
also varies, except for one major outcome of
critical importance to the California economy:
accelerated R&D. Companies of all ages and
size report enhanced recruitment of key R&D
personnel. Many also report that the research
project played a role in refocusing their R&D
programs.
Young companies report an enhanced ability
to raise capital investments and other sources
of funding. The firms surveyed did not
disclose the amounts raised.
In a separate project aimed at understanding
the business development successes of
sponsor firms, the IUCRP Economic Research
team found that of the 353 UC Discovery
Grant Sponsor Firms, 156 were at a lifecycle
stage appropriate for raising venture
capital. Of these, 68 are included in the
PriceWaterhouseCooper Moneytree database,
which shows that:
41 (60%) raised $1.4 billion in 103
deals in the period following their
first participation in IUCRP matching
grants
• On average, the 41 raised $34 million
per company
8 of the 41 raised $215.6 million, the
entirety of their venture investment
(to date), after their first participation
in IUCRP matching grants
• On average, the 8 raised $27 million
per company
Another project tracks the 51 (to date) IUCRP
sponsor firms that had 10 or fewer employees
at the time of their first matching grant. 80%
(41) are still in operation, including two young
firms that were acquired by other companies
Capital Formation
Survival and Exits of Small and
Young firms
Participation enabled them to undertake
something they could not do in-house…………………96%
… due to:
insufficient expertise……………………..68%
insufficient financial resources………….52%
insufficient research infrastructure……..51%
focus outside main R&D goals or
too high risk……………………………….64%
Participation lead to new collaborations
with other firms……………………………………………33%
Engaged students from sponsored project in:
company internships……………………..36%
company employment in R&D..…………30%
Participation helped the company:
raise capital………………………………..22%
attract other investments…………………29%
recruit key personnel……………………..49%
accelerate R&D……………………………86%
refocus R&D……………………………….45%
Would engage in another IUCRP matching
grant research project…………………………………….92%
Preliminary Survey Results: Sponsor Companies
(n=73 Sponsor Companies in preliminary sample)
IUCRP sponsor companies, like companies
throughout the state and nation, have been
weathering hostile economic and business
climates. It is times like these when leveraged
investments and savvy R&D business decisions
are most crucial.

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Success is a great investment
Page 9
Intellectual Property Activity
When firms sponsor IUCRP research projects,
they enter into a formal research agreement
with the UC investigator’s campus which
offers an opportunity to include provisions
for accessing intellectual property rights
on inventions stemming from the project.
Intellectual property rights provide an
important form of market access protection
for companies. The Economic Research Team
has an effort underway to track any resulting
intellectual property activity, although the
university’s reporting systems do not facilitate
the kinds of analyses needed.
Of the 595 UC Discovery Grants jointly
supported, to date, they have so far
identified 103 formal invention disclosures by
UC investigators and their students (including
60 disclosures in the life sciences and 43 in
engineering). 22 licenses have been granted
(20 in life sciences and 2 in engineering).
Information on possible revenue streams
generated by these licenses was not available
at the time of this report. Both the disclosure
and license numbers are considered low
estimates and more thorough analyses are
being attempted.
Survival Rates of Very Small Sponsor Companies by Industry Sector
(10 or fewer employees at time of grant; % in business)
and continue operation in California.
Life science firms account for 31 firms, of
which 84% (26 firms) are still in operation and
16% (5 firms) have exited. The IUCRP sponsor
firms appear to be doing notably better than
their cohorts, statewide, where the exit rate
is 29%.
Two small young firms that are counted among
the surviving firms, were acquired: Clinical
Micro Sensors, Inc (acquired by Motorola)
and Myelos Corporation (acquired by Bio-
Technology General Corp.).

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Success is a great investment
Page 9
IUCRP UC Discovery Grant success story
Fighting Malaria:
Creating cheap, simple microbial drug factories
Worldwide, nearly two million people die of
malaria every year. Unfortunately, the most widely
available, affordable anti-malarial drugs are based
on chloroquine, and the Plasmodium parasite that
causes malaria has developed resistance to it.
Drugs based on an ancient Chinese extract of the
plant Sweet Wormwood, or Artemisia annua, are
more effective, but they are too expensive for
most people in developing nations.
What
if
large
q u a n t i t i e s
of
advanced
medications could be
made cheaply? What
if it could be done in
an environmentally
friendly way, without
harvesting protected
organisms?
Dr. Jay Keasling, Pro-
fessor of Chemical
Engineering at UC
Berkeley, and Maxy-
gen, a California-based biotechnology company,
have come up with a way to do just that. Through
a research partnership funded by a UC Discovery
Grant, Keasling and Maxygen modified the bacteri-
um Escherichia coli to produce complex chemicals
with medicinal qualities. The bacterium can now
produce amorphadiene, a precursor to the anti-
malaria drug artemisinin — the active ingredient in
Sweet Wormwood extracts— and the most difficult
step in synthesizing the drug.
To produce amorphadiene in E. coli, Keasling and
his research team inserted a combination of genes
from E. coli, yeast, and Sweet Wormwood into
the host bacterium to construct an entirely new
metabolic pathway. The modified bacterium now
converts inexpensive sugars into large quantities of
amorphadiene. By cloning one or two more genes
from Sweet Wormwood, it will be possible to produce
large quantities of artemisinin inexpensively.
What’s in it for the California economy? Well,
IUCRP UC Discovery Grant success story
this same drug production method can be used
to manufacture many other compounds from
the isoprenoid family, including terpene-based
fragrances and flavors. Steve del Cardayre is
Product Manager-Fermentation at Codexis the
spinoff of Maxygen that is pursuing the research
with Keasling. He says that the UC Discovery
Grant gave the company a valuable opportunity to
undertake exploratory and fairly high risk research
and validate their approach to producing these
value-added products. According to del Cardayre,
the product lines “looked good on paper” but
the science was at such an early stage it was not
possible for the firm to make an informed decision
about investing in an all-out R&D program.
Keasling’s work showed that the science works
but alerted Codexis to the substantial additional
investment required to actually develop and
commercialize fragrance and flavor products.
They decided not to pursue in-house development
of the products and redirected their efforts to
marketing the tools developed in their research
partnership with Keasling as part of their
technology portfolio.
Del Cardayre emphasizes that the UC Discovery
Grant gave them a valuable opportunity to
undertake the exploratory research that both
validated the approach and showed the expense
to be prohibitive. It saved them from making
substantial investment in something that
ultimately would prove to expensive to pursue.
In addition to substantial cost savings that freed
up internal R&D resources for other strategic
targetes, the project added a new technology to
their technology offerings.
Dr. Jay Keasling
Prof. Jay Keasling, Chemical Engineering, UC Berkeley
Title: Metabolic Engineering of Microorganisms for Sesquiterpene
Production
Grant #: (Bio99-10044) Grant Period: 9/1/2000-8/31/2002
Grant #: (biostar 01-10223) Grant Period: 8/13/2002-8/12/2003
Industry Sponsor: Maxygen, Inc. (later acquired by Codexis, Inc.)

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Success is a great investment
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Success is a great investment
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How does a promising young, cash-
strapped start-up company break into the
highly competitive world of commercial
pharmaceuticals? The Nereus Pharmaceuticals
strategy has focused, in part, on maximal
leveraging of its limited R&D funding through
UC Discovery Grants that enable research
partnerships with UC faculty and students.
Nereus, a drug discovery and development
company,
is
searching the world
for new “privileged
s t r u c t u r e s ”
compounds
developed in nature
over millions of years
of evolution that are
likely to serve an
important biological
function.
Seeking
both the required
technical expertise and laboratory facilities,
Nereus turned to UC San Diego medicinal
Chemist, Professor Emmanuel Theodorakis, to
help them study acanthoic acid, a promising
drug candidate for treatment of inflammatory
diseases. The critical problem was producing
quantities of the molecule sufficient for the
needed research and testing. Acanthoic acid
is produced only in a slow-growing shrub on a
remote Korean island.
In little more than a year, Theodorakis
and his students developed a process for
synthesizing acanthoic acid and nearly one
hundred different analogs of the molecule
– each representing a potential drug
candidate. “Theodorakis’ expertise saved
us a lot of time with the synthesis,” says Dr.
Michael Pallandino, Nereus Vice President
Gaining the competitive edge through
public-private partnerships
of Technology. “I think the benefits of the
partnership have been pretty significant. It
has allowed us to do chemistry with one
of the top groups in the world.” More
importantly, it allowed the young company
to pursue cutting edge research before it had
laboratory facilities.
“It’s really an interesting situation,” says UC
San Diego’s Thoedorakis. “They rely on us to
make molecules and we rely on them to move
them to practical application in medicine. In
my case, Palladino brought the compound to
my attention. I wouldn’t have started this
particular project on my own.” Theodorakis’
team focused on the chemistry while Nereus
ran biological assays to determine medicinal
value – often in the same day. “We can
respond very quickly to changes in the
science,” said Palladino. “It has really moved
the project along.” Thanks to this research,
Nereus has advanced several drug candidates
into pre-clinical trials.
As for the firm’s business development plan,
Nereus’ Dr. Ken Lloyd says that “the UC
Discovery Grant was essential. It gave us
hard data to support our scientific platform
and raise funding from venture capitalists.”
IUCRP UC Discovery Grant success story
Professor Immanuel Theodorakis, Chemistry and Biochemistry,
UC San Diego
Title: Design and Synthesis of Novel TNF-a Inhibitors
Grant # (S98-69) Grant Period: 6/30/1999- 6/29/2002
Grant # (biostar01-10222) Grant Period: 8/13/2002-8/12/2003
Prof. Emmanuel Theodoakis
Private sponsor:
Nereus Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

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A billion times a day, a packet of data
zooms down an optical fiber in a computer
network – a stock purchase, traffic report,
scientific analyses, or e-mail to grandma.
When the packet reaches a routing point, a
decision must be made about where to send
it next. Therein lies an increasingly serious
networking problem: current systems lack
the intelligence to make the decision, and
require a time-consuming conversion of the
signal from optical to electronic. With our
rapidly expanding
d e p e n d e n c e
on
information
networks in all
aspects of our
lives, it is clear
that
today’s
networks
cannot
handle the flood of
information.
Cisco Systems, a
California-based
company, is the
leading supplier of networking equipment
for internet service providers and enterprise
networks. Routers are the premier product.
Cisco’s Javad Boroumand says that the
company does not conduct basic research
itself, yet research and insight into the next
technology breakthroughs are essential for
it to stay on top. To address the looming
problem, Cisco leaders decided to partner
with UC Santa Barbara’s Dan Blumenthal and
his team of researchers and students. In a
short period of time, the research partnership,
enabled in part by the UC Discovery Grant,
produced an all-optical routing technology
that eliminates the delays caused by optical-
to-electronic conversion.
Blumenthal acknowledges that this project
produced about “10% of what is needed to
The Critical Ten Percent
bring the technology to practical, wide-spread
application. The 10% of work done includes
the critical elements that allow industry in
the California economy to then invest in the
next 90% so that it has economic benefits. The
UC Discovery Grant and the partnership with
industry and the University system allows this
critical 10% to keep going.”
Cisco’s Boroumand says, “That’s what
universities do best, it’s a place of research.
When you compare that versus contracting for
that kind of work, the cost is not comparable.
And it provides a very stable environment that
is intellectually very rich.” For Blumenthal,
the benefits extend much further. All sixteen
student and faculty members of his laboratory
have gained from the research partnership.
“We need a new generation of people to take
this area forward. There’s no point of going
into new technologies if the people are not
there who understand them and know how
to apply them. If I do my job right, they’ll
know more about what they can do when they
graduate.”
Cisco’s Boroumand agrees, “Working with a
bunch of grad students and having them be
pretty visible to us, we can make our focus
on hiring much smarter than if we go by what
they have done just purely academically or
in their other employment. We have hired a
number of students.”
Professor Blumenthal and Cisco Systems
are currently engaged in their second UC
Discovery Grant project, scheduled for
completion in 2005.
IUCRP UC Discovery Grant success story
Dr. Dan Blumenthal
Prof. Daniel J. Blumenthal, Electrical and Computer
Engineering,
UC Santa Barbara
Title: All-Optical Label Swapping Adaptation Layers and Network
Interfaces
Grant # (dimi00-10125), Grant Period: 9/10/2002- 9/9/2005
Grant # (dimi00-10097), Grant Period: 9/7/2001- 9/6/2002
Industry Sponsor: Cisco Systems

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Impact on California
Strengthening and Expanding California’s
R&D Capacity:
From the previous sections, it is clear that
the IUCRP attracts a wide spectrum of strong
and promising companies into partnerships
with UC researchers. It is not reasonable
to attribute the success of these companies
solely to their participation in discrete
research projects with the University. It is,
however, clear that these companies seek to
partner with the University to help advance
their critical, strategic R&D goals.
Summarizing what was described above in
terms of state impact, California’s investment
in the IUCRP’s UC Discovery Grants has:
• Enabled 353 firms to strengthen their
competitive R&D programs through
partnership with UC researchers
• Influenced the ability of promising
young R&D firms to raise capital
investments in a very difficult
economic time
• Enabled competitive young firms
to leverage substantially their very
limited R&D funds through partnership
with UC researchers and increase their
chances for survival in a harsh business
climate
• Drawn more than 550 UC researchers
into joint action with California
companies on R&D problems relevant
to the California economy
Addressing California’s Areas of
Special Need:
Agriculture, water and food quality: Hard
pressed by public concerns about food and
water quality, California farmers are engaging
in IUCRP research partnerships through
agricultural R&D firms and the California
Market Order Boards to address an array
of plant pest problems, seeking early pest
detection strategies and identifying novel
products and genes that provide protection
and reduce chemical pesticide use. They
have also jointly supported research on
drought tolerance, aimed at developing
crops that require less water. Other projects
focus on improving the quality of foods
derived from California crop plants.
Health care: Given the size and complexity
of its population, California suffers more
than other states from the impact of
healthcare costs and workforce losses due to
illness. The majority of life science research
projects are jointly sponsored by California
biotechnology firms and many are focused on
identifying new candidates for therapeutic
drugs and diagnostics, or on developing
powerful new technologies to advance drug
discovery.
Growing New Businesses, Growing
New R&D Leaders:
The career paths of students emerging from
IUCRP’s UC Discovery Grants are of particular
interest.
Their experience in industry-
relevant research programs make them
attractive recruits for companies. Moreover,
as the recent survey demonstrates, many
of the students are taking leadership roles,
building new firms. These are California’s
new and future R&D leaders.
TransOptix (formerly Advanced Optical MEMS): Charles Chu
Amyris Biotechnologies: Vincent Martin, Keith Kinkead Reiling,
Neil Renninger, Jack Newman
Catalyst Biosciences: Sandra Waugh Ruggles
eBioscience: George Lai
FilGen Bio Sciences,Inc.: Alfredo Galvez
Intelligent Epitaxy Technology: Wayne Wang and James Dong
NeoGene: Reinscheid Nothacker
Neurogenetics: S. Daddario
OnWafer: Mason Freed
Pravieum Research: Vijay Jayaraman
Protein Pathways: Matteo Pellegrini and Mike Thompson
Softmax: Te-Won Lee and Tzyy-Ping Jun
Surfx Technologies, LLC: Steve Babayan
TierraVision: Will Cooper
Timbre Technologies: Nickhil Jakatdar, Xinhui Niu, and Junwei Bao
World Energy Labs: Kurt Salloux
Businesses Started by
IUCRP-Supported Students
Updated 12/1/03

Page 14
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Page 13
According to the preliminary responses to
the survey, at least a dozen new companies
have been launched by students whose
research education was supported, in part,
by IUCRP matching grants -- which provided
the students direct exposure to the problems
confronting industry and the opportunities for
entrepreneurial business development. A list
of those companies and student founders is
provided in the box.
Timbre Technologies was founded by three
UC Berkeley students who were supported
in an IUCRP matching grant for electronics
manufacturing research (see Success Story,
below). TransOptix Inc. (formerly Advanced
Optical MEMS) was founded by Dr. Charles
Chu, who had participated as a student in
an IUCRP-sponsored research project lead by
Professor G. P. Li at the UC Irvine Integrated
Nanosystems Facility (INRF). It is worth noting
that Professor Li attributes the development
of the INRF, itself, to a seed grant jointly
funded by a consortium of companies and an
IUCRP matching grant. The INRF currently
engages 52 companies in research, 80% of
which are small firms. Simultaneously, INRF
faculty are educating dozens of students.
The Economic Research team tracks the
entrepreneurial
business
development
The California economy has experienced
a tremendous downswing, taking with it
hundreds of thousands of jobs. The box
shows employment changes at sponsor firms
(where data is available). Larger companies
show heavy net losses due to massive layoffs
(i.e., Silicon Graphics Inc., H-P, Intel,
ChevronTexaco Corporation, Sony Pictures
Entertainment, Sony Technology Center-
San Diego, Nortel Networks Corporation,
QUALCOMM Inc., Advanced Micro Devices,
Motorola, Syngenta Crop Protection, Ericcson
CDMA Systems Division, Atmel Corp., KLA-
Tencor Corporation).
Smaller firms show growth, with more than
5,000 net new California jobs created by firms
that had fewer than 500 employees at the
time of their first IUCRP matching grant.
Creating Jobs Even in Tough
Economic times
California
Employment
at first IUCRP
matching grant
Number
of Sponsor
Firms
Number of
Surviving
Sponsor
Firms
(% with current
employment data)
Current
California
Employment
Net number of
jobs added by
surviving firms
Number of
surviving firms
with employment
growth
Net number
of jobs added
by surviving
firms**
0-10
51
41 (95%)
507
285
16
262
0-10
(subsidiaries)
22
21 (73%)
94
(9)
-
(9)
11-50
90
81 (96%)
3,665
1,364
43
1,364
51-500
97
90 (71%)
23,566
3,584
23
3,584
501-1,000
23
22 (65%)
14,837
(2,453)
-
(2,453)
1,001+
52
52 (70%)
319,601
(12,504)
10
(12,504)***
Grand Total
336
307
362,223
92
IUCRP Sponsor Companies Create New California Jobs
activity stimulated by IUCRP matching grants.
These nascent companies are subsequently
included in their ongoing longitudinal
analyses performed on major California
industry sectors.

Page 15
Success is a great investment
Page 14
Success is a great investment
Page 15
IUCRP UC Discovery Grant success story
Fertile Ground for California Entrepreneurs
Integrated nanosystems research is
driving electronics manufacturing towards
extraordinarily small machines, sensors, and
motors. Under Professor G.P. Li’s leadership,
a group of UC Irvine faculty set a bold course
for the Integrated Nanosystems Research
Facility (INRF), aiming to “engineer the
microworld” through application of molecular-
scale mechanisms of biology, chemistry, and
photonics, a willingness to pursue non-traditional
manufacturing techniques, and a commitment
to design based on holistic understanding of
technology as part of a system.
“Prior to receiving a UC Discovery Grant, the
INRF facility was a small collection of faculty
working with a handful of companies, according
to Li. Within three years, the facility has grown
tremendously in both research programs and
industry collaborations. Research funding from
companies quadrupled.”
A number of major outcomes stemming from UC
Discovery Grant support:
• Rapidly expanding industry participation:
“We have already engaged 52 companies,
80% of which are small firms that report
the interaction has been extremely
beneficial for their growth, says Professor
Li. They gain essential proof of concept
for their product candidates and many
have started their own clean room
fabrication facilities following on their
experience with the INRF.”
• Business creation: Charles Chu, an INRF
student supported by a UC Discovery
Grant, created a company, Advanced
Optical MEMS (now known as TransOptix).
• Major Federal investments: A
UC Discovery Grant helped INRF
investigators develop research ideas
that lead to a $1.2 million DARPA grant,
awarded in October 2003. Headed
by INRF’s Professor Franco De Flaviis,
the project will fabricate lighter, less
expensive “phased array” antennas for
incorporation into commercial products.
The team includes Professor Li and
another UC Discovery Grant Investigator,
IUCRP UC Discovery Grant success story
Professor Mark Bachman. According to
the campus press release, De Flaviis is
the first to fabricate simultaneously an
array of antennas and a phase shifter,
the component that adjusts and directs
the antennas. De Flaviis and Bachman
were entry-level Assistant Professor and
Assistant Adjunct Professor, respectively,
at the time they received their first
funding from the UC Discovery Grants.
Industry Sponsors:
UC Irvine Integrated Nanosystems
Facility
Advanced Custom Sensors, Inc
Alpha Photonics
Alpine Microsystems
Bethel Materials Research
Global Communication
Semiconductors, Inc.
Hitachi Chemical Research
MPCO Technologies
Intelligent Epitaxy Technology
International Technology
Works
MetroLaser, Inc
Microtek Lab, Inc
Network Device, Inc
NexGen Research
Northrop Grumman Corp
ProComm Enterprises
Raytheon Electronic Systems
Semco Laser Technology
SVT Associates
Tanner Research Technology
Grant # SM98-01
PI: G.P. Li, UC Irvine
Grant Title: “MEMOS Manufacturing Research
for Integrated System Technologies”
Grant Period: 7/1/1999-6/30/2001
Advanced Optical MEMS, Inc
AXT, Inc
Bethel Materials Research
Broadley James Corp
Intelligent Epitaxy
Technology
Numerical Technologies, Inc
Oplink Technologies, Inc
Physical Optics Corp
Raytheon Electronic
Systems
RF Integrated Corp
Y Media
Industry Sponsors:
Grant #smart00-10076
PI: G.P. Li, UC Irvine
Grant Title: “Integrated Information and Communication
System Technologies”
Grant Period: 8/24/2001-8/23/2003

Page 16
Success is a great investment
Page 14
Success is a great investment
Page 15
Making increasingly smaller electronic
features on semiconductors both more
reliably, efficiently, and cost-effectively is the
primary goal of the worldwide semiconductor
manufacturing industry. Two UC Berkeley
graduate students found a way to do it – and
started Timbre Technologies, a company
they sold two years later to an international
manufacturing firm for $138 million.
J a k a t d a r
Nickhil and
Xinhui Niu,
t o g e t h e r
with fellow
engineering
s t u d e n t ,
J u n w e i
Bao, were
w o r k i n g
in
the
laboratory
of UC Berkeley Engineering Professor Costas
Spanos on a research project focused on
developing ways to measure features and
spot errors on semiconductors. The project
was funded by a UC Discovery Grant.
According to Spanos, “the original way of
measuring consisted of using an electron
microscope. Timbre Technologies’ alternative
involved optical mathematical analyses. The
technological development is now being
introduced, worldwide.”
Tokyo Electron
Limited, which has a significant manufacturing
presence in California and has nearly 80% of the
worldwide market for lithography equipment,
had been looking for a more efficient way of
making semiconductors and for software to
integrate their system. Timbre Technologies
had a solution. “Timbre was the latest and
the best technology available,” says Mindy
Student Entrepreneurs:
Berkeley student researchers enhance semiconductor manufacturing
Russell, marketing communications manager
at Tokyo Electron Limited. The technology is
now considered essential for process controls
and yield management in manufacturing
semiconductor chip patterns at the sub-100
nanometer level.
How did they get from an academic research
project to commercial success? First, they
performed outstanding research, which
culminated in a scientific publication that
was awarded the IEEE 2001 Best Paper Award.
Second, they entered the UC Berkeley Haas
School of Business’ Annual Business Plan
Competition, in 1999 and won the $8,000 first
prize. “There was enough press to catch the
eye of potential customers,” says Jakatdar.
“Without the competition, it’s hard to say
where we would be, but we would not have
gotten where we are so quickly without it.”
Through its California arm, Tokyo Electron,
Ltd has joined a consortium of companies that
support a renewal UC Discovery Grant that is
enabling Professor Spanos and his colleagues
working at several different UC campuses
to extend their research and provide
opportunities for additional students.
IUCRP UC Discovery Grant success story
Industry sponsors:
Nickhil Jakatdar, Xinhui Niu and Junwei Bao
remarkable student entrepreneurs
Applied Materials
Lam Research Corporation
Advanced Micro Devices
Texas Instruments
Intel Corporation
Advanced Energy
Aplex Inc.
Asyst Technologies, Inc.
Atmel Corporation
BOC Edwards Vacuum
Technology
Cymer, Inc.
Etec Systems, Inc. (Applied
Materials)
KLA-Tencor
Nanometrics
National Semiconductor
Nikon Research
Corporation of
America
Novellus
Grant #: SM98-01
PI: Costas J. Spanos, UC Berkeley
Grant Title: “Small Feature Reproducibility”
Grant Period: 6/30/1998 - 6/29/2000

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Producing California’s R&D Workforce
The IUCRP’s UC Discovery Grants have
supported more than 2,100 research
assistantships
for
graduate
students
(55%), postdoctoral students (35%), and
undergraduates (10%). These students are
actively engaged in sophisticated research
projects focused on problems of direct
relevance to industry and the California
economy. They experience, first hand, the
practical aspects that companies confront.
The average participating student spends
eighteen months engaged in a sponsored
research project and the average grant
supports three and a half students.
In the course of the research projects, students
are included in meetings with company
representatives, presenting research results
and engaging in discussions. The students
sometimes have the opportunity to perform
research internships at the sponsor company.
Some of the students work with the advisors
in preparing successful proposals for industry
or federal funding to extend the work begun
with the IUCRP matching grant. A large
percentage of students co-author scientific
publications.
About a third of companies responding to the
survey have hired students from their IUCRP
matching grant projects. More than half of
responding UC investigators report that their
supported students have been hired by other
firms. Some of the students pursue academic
careers where their research experience
influences their teaching and research
programs. Many of the younger students
advance to the next stage in their education
(i.e., from graduate student to postdoc and
from undergraduate to graduate student).
The capacity for the IUCRP to continue to
produce a steady stream of highly skilled
candidates for the state’s R&D workforce is
being seriously compromised by increases
in student fees, that have already grown to
30% for graduate students and are expected
to grow more over the coming year. These
increases are significantly eroding the value
of the IUCRP matching grant dollar.
The Value of the IUCRP
The IUCRP helps make things happen for California R&D companies. Key to the
program’s value are its:
• management principles based on commitment to quality and relevance;
• reconnaissance, analysis, and communication capabilities;
• new capacity to define and mobilize networks of expertise;
• investment in economic research and impact analyses.

Page 18
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Page 17
Financial Report
IUCRP management of the UC Discovery
Grants is is guided by a set of fundamental
principles aimed at:
• optimizing operational performance
• minimizing risk
• ensuring a high degree of
accountability
• facilitating participation
• emphasizing transparency and
reasonableness in reporting
requirements
• reducing unnecessary bureaucracy
• promoting ongoing consultation with
UC and Industry research leaders
UC Discovery Grants Management
UC Discovery Grants Governance and
Quality Control
Each UC Discovery Grant research proposal
is rigorously peer reviewed by expert UC
scientists and engineers.
Grant funding
decisions for UC Discovery Grants are made
by five field-specific Executive Committees
comprised of expert scientists and engineers
drawn from each of the campuses and National
Laboratories of the UC system. Decisions
for MICRO Grants are made by the MICRO
Executive Committee. (Lists are provided at
the end of this report.)
Budget -
Impact of the State Fiscal Crisis
This section focuses solely on the IUCRP
budget for the UC Discovery Grants. During
the period 1996-2000, IUCRP leadership
successfully pursued increasing levels of
permanent State funding, bringing it to $17
million/year. The University contribution
was maintained at a steady $3 million/year.
Industry contributions have risen fairly
steadily and consistently exceeded the
required $1:$1 match, even during the recent
economic downturn.
The State’s continuing fiscal crisis has
resulted in a series of budget cuts to the
State’s contribution. A 10% cut was allocated
in fiscal year 2002-2003 and a second 10% cut
is being applied in the current fiscal year,
2003-2004. These cuts are applied across-
the-board to the research function of the UC
Regents Budget. Together, they have reduced
the State’s annual contribution to $14.5
million for the fiscal year 2003-2004.
At the same time, graduate student fees have
increased 30% (see figure, this page), which
affect the IUCRP resource base as a de facto
budget cut of approximately $1.4 million
in fiscal year 2003-2004 for ongoing grants
and another $700,000 for new grants to be
awarded, this year.
UC Graduate Fees
This section focuses primarily on IUCRP
operations for the UC Discovery Grants, and
not the MICRO Program. Where the report
includes MICRO information, it is clearly
stated.
Oversight and advice for the IUCRP is
provided by the President’s Board on Science
and Innovation, and the IUCRP Steering
Committee. Membership lists are provided at
the end of the report.
IUCRP Investment Fund Growth through FY 02-03
Includes MICRO Investments
Funds received, except for most recent year

Page 19
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Portfolio
Since 1996, the jointly funded investment
portfolio, including both UC Discovery Grants
and MICRO grants and fellowships, has grown
to 1,189 grants amounting to $281 million
in State ($112.6 million), Industry ($147.5
million), and UC ($21 million) investments.
This amount includes funds received from all
sources except for the grants launched in the
most recent fiscal year (company sponsors
usually structure quarterly payments, in
advance).
High tech and life science investments split
roughly 52:48 for the IUCRP’s UC Discovery
Grants (58:42 when MICRO investments are
included). Research partnerships continue to
expand at the nine established UC campuses
and two of the three Department of Energy
Laboratories.
100% of Industry investments in UC Discovery
Grants are expended on research, with
81% dedicated to direct costs, and 19% to
indirect costs. Of State and UC funds, 86%
are invested in research grants and awards,
4.33% is expended on research surveillance,
development, and network building, and 8.4%
is expended on administration and governance
(when Industry grants are considered, the
actual cost of administering the UC Discovery
Grants drops to less than 4%).
The typical research grant (including pooled
State, UC, and Industry funds) invests 44% of
funds in research supplies, equipment and
travel, and 56% in personnel. Approximately
35% of personnel expenditures are directed
to research assistantships for students
(graduate student, postdoctoral student, and
undergraduate).
IUCRP UC Discovery Grant Investment
Portfolio
Investment by Major Field
52%
48%
Taken together, the cuts and fee increases
effectively reduce the State funds available
this year for new research partnerships by
more than $5 million. IUCRP leadership has
mounted an educational effort to explain the
value and impact of the program to the State,
California industry, and the University.
Typical Research Grant Expenditures
Allocation of
Private Sponsor Funds
100% Research
Industry Investments
Direct and Indirect Costs
(with MICRO)
81%
19%

Page 20
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Page 19
Joint Grant Investments Across UC System
(with MICRO)
Figures do not include MICRO, unless otherwise indicated
IUCRP UC Discovery Grant
Annual Allocation of State and UC Funds
IUCRP UC Discovery Grant
Joint Grant Investments by Year
less modifications to funded grants effective in that fiscal year
86%

Page 21
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IUCRP Management
Appendix A: Management and Governance
Dr. Susanne Huttner
Executive Director
Corinne Beauvais
Manager of Governance and
Executive Relations
Dr. Sarah Peach
Director of New Initiatives
Dr. Cherisa Yarkin
Director, Economic Research
and Assessment
Dr. Julie Stein
Portfolio Manager
Dan Tormey
Director, Business and
Operations
IUCRP Contact Information
2087 Addison Street
2nd Floor
Berkeley, CA 94720-3340
Ph: (510) 643-3229
Fax: (510) 643-7839
www.ucdiscoverygrant.org

Page 22
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Dr. Robert C. Dynes
President
University of California
Dr. Robert Conn
Managing Director
Enterprise Partners Venture Capital
Dr. Andrew Cromarty
Chief Executive Officer
City Lights Network
Mr. Richard Elkus
Co-Chairman and CEO
Voyan Technology
Ms. Judith Estrin
President and Chief Executive
Officer
Packet Design
Mr. Jerry Fiddler
Chairman and Co-Founder
Wind River
Mr. Fred Kavli
Chairman
The Kavli Foundation/
The Kavli Institute
Dr. James Lemke
Chairman
Recording Physics, Inc.
Dr. Richard A. Lerner
President
The Scripps Research Institute
Mr. John Major, J.D.
President
MTSG
Mr. John Malin
Vice President, Technology
MARS Incorporated
Dr. Pamela Marrone
President and Chief Executive
Officer
AgraQuest, Inc.
Dr. Tapan Munroe
President
Munroe Consulting, Inc.
Dr. Edward Penhoet
Chief Program Officer
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
Ms. Kim Polese
Chairman
Marimba, Inc.
Dr. Gordon Ringold
Co-Founder, Chairman, and CEO
SurroMed
Mr. Sanford R. Robertson
Partner
Francisco Partners
Mr. Duane Roth
Chairman and CEO
Alliance Pharmaceutical
Corporation
Dr. Henry Samueli
Co-Chairman and CTO
Broadcom Corporation
Mr. Larry W. Sonsini
Chairman and CEO
Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati
Dr. Robert B. Stein
President
Roche Palo Alto
Ex Officio Members
Dr. Lawrence B. Coleman
Vice Provost of Research
Office of Research
University of California
Office of the President
Mr. Bruce Darling
Senior Vice President,
University Affairs and
University of California
Office of the President
Dr. John Edmond
Academic Senate Representative
Professor of Biological Chemistry
Mental Retardation Research
Center
School of Medicine
University of California, Los
Angeles
Mr. Lawrence C. Hershman
Vice President for Budget
University of California
Office of the President
Dr. Susanne Huttner
Executive Director
Industry-University Cooperative
Research Program
Associate Vice Provost for
Research
University of California
Office of the President
Dr. C. Judson King
Provost and Senior Vice President
Academic Affairs
University of California
Office of the President
Mr. Joseph P. Mullinix
Senior Vice President
Business and Finance
University of California
Office of the President
President’s Board on Science and Innovation
Members
Appendix A: Management and Governance

Page 23
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Dr. Henry D.I. Abarbanel
University Committee
on Research Policy
Professor of Physics
University of California, San Diego
Dr. Richard Attiyeh
Vice Chancellor for Research
Dean of Graduate Studies
University of California, San Diego
Dr. Alan B. Bennett
Executive Director
Research Admin. & Technology
Transfer
University of California
Office of the President
Dr. John Bowers
Professor and Director
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Walsin-Lihwa Electronics & Photonics
Center
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9560
Dr. Michael Clegg
Distinguished Professor of Genetics
College of Natural & Agricultural
Sciences
University of California, Riverside
Dr. Lawrence B. Coleman
Vice Provost for Research
Office of Research
University of California
Office of the President
Dr. John Edmond
Professor
Mental Retardation Research
Center
Department of Biological Chemistry
UCLA School of Medicine
Dr. Susanne Huttner
Executive Director
Industry-University Cooperative
Research Program
Associate Vice Provost for Research
University of California
Office of the President
Dr. Lovell (Tu) S. Jarvis
Divisional Associate Dean for
Human Sciences
College of Agricultural &
Environmental Sciences
University of California, Davis
Dr. Jay D. Keasling
Professor of Chemical Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
Chairman of the IUCRP Council of
Executive Committee Chairs
Dr. Patrick Mantey
Jack Baskin Professor
of Computer Engineering
Institute for Networking,
Information Systems and
Technologies
University of California, Santa Cruz
Dr. Piermaria J. Oddone
Deputy Director
Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory
Dr. Robert Powell
Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering
& Materials Science
University of California, Davis
Dr. Matthew Tirrell
The Richard A. Auhll Professor
Dean of Engineering
University of California, Santa
Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
Dr. Mary Walshok
Associate Vice Chancellor
for Public Programs
Dean of University Education
University of California, San Diego
Dr. A.R. Frank Wazzan
Henry Samueli School of Engineering
& Applied Science
University of California, Los Angeles
Ms. Barbara Yoder
Contract and Grant Officer
Office of Technology Transfer
University of California
Office of the President
Dr. John Zysman
Professor, Political Science
Co-Director
Berkeley Roundtable on the
International Economy
University of California, Berkeley
Ex Officio Participants
Mr. Steven A. Arditti
Assistant Vice President &
Director
State Government Relations
University of California
Mr. Bruce Darling
Senior Vice President,
University Affairs and
University of California
Office of the President
Mr. Lawrence C. Hershman
Vice President for Budget
University of California
Office of the President
Dr. C. Judson King
Provost and Senior Vice President
Academic Affairs
University of California
Office of the President
Mr. Joseph P. Mullinix
Senior Vice President
Business and Finance
University of California
Office of the President
IUCRP Steering Commitee
Appendix A: Management and Governance

Page 24
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Biotechnology Executive Committee Members
University of California,
Berkeley
Chair
Jay Keasling, PhD
Professor
Chemical Engineering
Agricultural Experiment
Station
Howard Judelson, PhD
Associate Professor & Plant
Pathologist
Plant Pathology
Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory
Heinz-Ulli Weier, PhD
Staff Scientist
Center for Molecular
Cytogenetics
Lawrence Livermore
National Laboratory
Andrew Wyrobek, PhD
Division Leader
Health Effects Genetics
Division
Biology & Biotechnology
Research
University of California,
Berkeley
Kevin Healy, PhD
Professor
Bioengineering
University of California,
Davis
David Block, PhD
Associate Professor
Viticulture & Enology
University of California,
Irvine
G Wesley Hatfield, PhD
Professor
Microbiology & Molecular
Genetics
University of California, Los
Angeles
C Fred Fox, PhD
Professor
Microbiology/Immunology/
Molecular Genetics
University of California,
Riverside
Brian Federici, PhD
Professor & Entomologist
Entomology
University of California, San
Diego
Robert Schmidt, PhD
Professor
Biology
University of California, San
Francisco
Charles Craik, PhD
Professor
Pharmaceutical Chemistry
University of California,
Santa Barbara
Charles Samuel, PhD
Professor
MCDB Biology
Communications and Networking Executive Committee Members
University of California,
Davis
Chair
Biswanath Mukherjee, PhD
Professor
Computer Science
Los Alamos National
Laboratory
Thomas M Boorman, PhD
Team Leader
CCN
University of California,
Berkeley
Ali M Niknejad, PhD
Assistant Professor
EECS
University of California,
Irvine
Rui J-P de Figueiredo, PhD
Professor
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
University of California,
Riverside
Chinya Ravishankar, PhD
Professor
Computer Science &
Engineering
University of California, San
Diego
Lawrence Larson, PhD
Professor
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
University of California,
Santa Cruz
Ken Pedrotti, PhD
Associate Professor
Electrical Engineering
Appendix A: Management and Governance

Page 25
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Page 25
Digital Media Executive Committee Members
University of California,
Berkeley
Chair
David Wessel, PhD
Director
Center for New Music & Audio
Technologies
Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory
Masoud Nikravesh, PhD
Assistant Research Engineer/
Staff Scientist
EECS/Computer Science
Los Alamos National
Laboratory
Richard Luce, PhD
Director
Research Library
University of California,
Davis
Shrinivasa Upadhyaya, PhD
Professor
Biological & Agricultural
Engineering
University of California, Los
Angeles
Arthur Toga, PhD
Professor
Neuro Imaging
University of California,
Riverside
Bir Bhanu, PhD
Professor
Electrical Engineering
University of California, San
Diego
Mohan M Trivedi, PhD
Professor
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
University of California, San
Francisco
Lawrence Litt, PhD
Professor
Anesthesia/Perioperative Care
University of California,
Santa Cruz
Dominic Massaro, PhD
Professor, Psychology
Psychology Faculty Services
Electronics Manufacturing Executive Committee Members
University of California, Los
Angeles
Chair
King-Ning Tu, PhD
Professor
Material Science &
Engineering
Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory
Glen Dahlbacka, PhD
Staff Scientist
Directorate
Lawrence Livermore
National Laboratory
James Folta, PhD
Staff Scientist
Engineering
Los Alamos National
Laboratory
Randy Tremper, PhD
Program Manager
Industrial Business
Development
University of California,
Berkeley
David Dornfeld, PhD
Professor & Associate Dean of
IDS
Mechanical Engineering
University of California,
Davis
Charles E Hunt, PhD
Professor
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
University of California,
Irvine
G P Li, PhD
Professor
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
University of California, Los
Angeles
Jane P Chang, PhD
Associate Professor
Chemical Engineering
University of California,
Riverside
Yushan Yan, PhD
Associate Professor
Chemical & Environmental
Engineering
University of California, San
Diego
George R Tynan, PhD
Associate Professor
Mechanical/Aerospace
Engineering
University of California,
Santa Barbara
Eray Aydil, PhD
Professor
Chemical Engineering
University of California,
Santa Cruz
Ali Shakouri, PhD
Associate Professor
Electrical Engineering
Appendix A: Management and Governance

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Page 25
Information Technology for Life Sciences Executive Committee Members
University of California,
San Diego
Chair
John Wooley
Associate Vice Chancellor-
Research
OGSR
Los Alamos National
Laboratory
Christian Forst, PhD
Technical Staff Member
Bioscience Division
University of California,
Berkeley
Adam P Arkin, PhD
Assistant Professor
Bioengineering
University of California,
Merced
Michael Colvin, PhD
Professor
Divisions of Natural Science
and Engineering
University of California,
San Diego
Mark Ellisman, PhD
Professor
SDSC/Neurosciences
University of California,
San Francisco
Hao Li, PhD
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry & Biophysics
University of California,
Santa Barbara
Ambuj K Singh, PhD
Professor
Computer Science
University of California,
Santa Cruz
Todd Wipke, PhD
Professor
Chemistry & Biochemistry
MICRO Executive Committee Members
University of California,
Santa Cruz
Professor F. Joel Ferguson
Computer Engineering
University of California,
San Diego
Professor Ian Galton
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
University of California,
Santa Barbara
Professor Malgorzata
Marek-Sadowska
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
University of California,
Riverside
Professor Walid Najjar
Computer Science
University of California,
Los Angeles
Professor M. Frank Chang
Electrical Engineering
University of California,
Davis
Professor G. Robert
Redinbo
Electrical and Computer
Engineering
University of California,
Irvine
Professor Debra Richardson
(Chair)
Informatics
University of California,
Berkeley
Professor Avideh Zakhor
Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science
Appendix A: Management and Governance

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UC Discovery Grant Sponsors
550 Digital Media Ventures
San Francisco, CA
Abbott Laboratories
Sacramento, CA
Advanced BioTechnologies
Goleta, CA
Advanced Custom Sensors, Inc.
Irvine, CA
Advanced Energy Industries
San Jose, CA
Advanced Micro Devices
Sunnyvale, CA
Advanced Tissue Sciences, Inc.
La Jolla, CA
Aeronex, Inc.
San Diego, CA
Affymax Research Institute
(now Affymax, Inc.)
Palo Alto, CA
AGFA Division/
Bayer Corporation
South San Francisco, CA
Agilent Technologies
Palo Alto, CA
Agility Communications, Inc.
Santa Barbara, CA
Agouron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
La Jolla, CA
AgraQuest, Inc.
Davis, CA
AgrEvo
(now Bayer CropScience)
Davis, CA
Agrigenetics, Inc.
dba Mycogen Seeds
San Diego, CA
Agy Therapeutics
South San Francisco, CA
Alameda Applied Sciences
Corporation
San Leandro, CA
ALEKS Corporation
Santa Ana, CA
Alias | Wavefront
Santa Barbara, CA
Allergan, Inc.
Irvine, CA
Alliance Pharmaceutical
Corporation
San Diego, CA
Allied Signal Advanced
Microelectronic Materials
(now Honeywell Electronic
Materials)
Sunnyvale, CA
Alpha Photonics Inc.
Fremont, CA
Alpine Microsystems (now
Alpine Semiconductor)
Campbell, CA
AMCC (Applied Micro Circuits
Corporation)
San Diego, CA
American Honda Motor Co.
Torrance, CA
Amgen, Inc.
Thousand Oaks, CA
ANADIGICS, Inc.
Newbury Park, CA
Anagene Corporation
Los Gatos, CA
AnalgesiX, Inc.
San Diego, CA
Analog Devices Inc.
Santa Clara, CA
Anawah
Davis, CA
Angiogenix, Inc.
Burlingame, CA
APCOOR (A joint venture of Ap-
plied Phytologics and Coors)
Sacramento, CA
Applied Materials, Inc.
Santa Clara, CA
Applied Phytologics (now
Ventria Biosciences)
Sacramento, CA
ArthroCare Corporation
Sunnyvale, CA
ASM Lithography (ASML)
San Jose, CA
Asyst Technologies, Inc.
Fremont, CA
Athena Neurosciences, Inc.
(now Elan)
South San Francisco, CA
Atmel Corporation
San Jose, CA
Aureal Semiconductor
Fremont, CA
Avigen, Inc.
Alameda, CA
AXT, Inc.
Fremont, CA
Baxter Cardiovascular (now
Edwards Lifesciences)
Irvine, CA
Baxter Hyland Immuno
Duarte, CA
Becton Dickinson
Immunocytometry Systems
(now BD Immunocytometry
Systems)
San Jose, CA
Bede Scientific Inc.
Englewood, CO
Berlex Biosciences
Richmond, CA
beta squared
Milpitas, CA
Bethel Material Research
Placentia, CA
Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc.
Hercules , CA
BioSource International, Inc.
Camarillo , CA
BioSource Technologies, Inc.
(now Large Scale Biology
Corporation)
Vacaville, CA
Bio-Trends International, Inc.
(now Intervet, Inc)
Sacramento, CA
BOC Edwards Vacuum
Technology
Santa Clara, CA
Bosch Research and Technol-
ogy Center - North America
- Palo Alto
Palo Alto, CA
Broadcom Corporation
Irvine, CA
Broadley-James Corporation
Irvine, CA
C3 Scientific Corporation
Los Angeles, CA
California Dairy Research
Foundation
Davis, CA
California Pistachio
Commission
Fresno, CA
Appendix B: IUCRP UC Discovery Grant
Participating Sponsor Companies

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California Prune Board (now
California Dried Plum Board)
Sacramento, CA
California Table Grape
Commission
Fresno, CA
California Tomato Commission
Fresno, CA
California Tree Fruit
Agreement
Reedley, CA
Canji, Inc.
San Diego, CA
Cedara Software Corporation
Los Gatos, CA
Celera Diagnostics
Alameda, CA
Centaur Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Santa Clara, CA
Ceres, Inc.
Los Angeles, CA
Chemat Technology
Northridge, CA
Chevron Corporation (now
ChevronTexaco Corporation)
San Francisco, CA
Chiron Corporation
Emeryville, CA
Chiron Viagene (now Cell
Genesys in San Diego)
San Diego, CA
ChromaVision Medical
Systems, Inc.
San Juan Capistrano, CA
Cisco Systems, Inc.
San Jose, CA
Clinical Micro Sensors, Inc.
Pasadena, CA
Collagen Corporation -Collagen
Technologies Group (now
NeuColl Inc.)
Campbell, CA
Conexant Systems, Inc.
Newport Beach, CA
Cortex Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Irvine, CA
Cotton Incorporated
Cary, NC
Covalent Materials, Inc (now
Nanomix, Inc.)
Emeryville, CA
Creative Advanced
Technology Center
Scotts Valley, CA
CREE, Inc.
Durham, NC
Cubic Defense Systems
San Diego, CA
Cymer, Inc.
San Diego, CA
Cypress Bioscience, Inc.
San Diego, CA
Cyrano Sciences
Pasadena, CA
DaimlerChrysler AG
Palo Alto, CA
DENSO Corporation Research
Laboratories
Nisshin, Japan
DermTech International
San Diego, CA
Digital Equipment Corporation
Western Research Laboratory
(now Hewlett-Packard Western
Res Lab)
Palo Alto, CA
Direct Enterprises, Inc.
Los Angeles, CA
Diversa Corporation
San Diego, CA
DNA Plant Technology
Corporation
Oakland, CA
Dow Agrosciences
San Diego, CA
Dupont Displays, Inc
Santa Barbara, CA
DyNAmix (now Dynavax
Technologies Corporation)
Berkeley, CA
Embi Tec
San Diego, CA
EMCORE Corporation
Somerset, NJ
E-mu Systems, Incorporated
Scotts Valley, CA
Endevco Corporation
San Juan Capistrano, CA
Engelhard Corporation
Fremont, CA
EOS Biotechnology, Inc.
South San Francisco, CA
Epichem, Inc
Haverhill, MA
EpiGenX Pharmaceuticals
Santa Barbara, CA
Ericsson CDMA Sys. Div. (aka
Ericsson Wireless)
San Diego, CA
ESRI
Redlands, CA
Etec Systems, Inc. (now Etec,
An Applied Materials Company)
Hayward, CA
Excess Bandwidth Corp.
Cupertino, CA
Exelixis, Inc
South San Francisco, CA
Express Packaging Systems, Inc.
Palo Alto, CA
Fast Track Systems, Inc.
San Mateo, CA
FibroGen, Inc.
South San Francisco, CA
FileNET Corporation
Costa Mesa, CA
FilGen Biosciences, Inc
Fairfield, CA
ForBio Research Pty Ltd.
Indooroopilly, Australia
Friends USA
Torrance, CA
Fuji Electric Corporation of
America
Santa Clara, CA
Fuji Photo Film U.S.A.
Elmsford, NY
FujiFilm Computer Products
Division
Cypress, CA
Genelabs Technologies, Inc.
Redwood City, CA
Genencor International, Inc.
Palo Alto, CA
Genentech, Inc.
South San Francisco, CA
General Atomics
San Diego, CA
General Electric Medical
Systems
Menlo Park, CA
General Mills, Inc.
Minneapolis, MN
Appendix B: IUCRP UC Discovery Grant
Participating Sponsor Companies

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General Monitors, Inc.
Lake Forest, CA
Geron Corporation
Menlo Park, CA
Gibson Guitar Corporation
Nashville, TN
Global Communication
Semiconductors, Inc.
Torrance, CA
Global Processing
Solutions, Inc.
Vacaville, CA
Glumetric
Santa Cruz, CA
Goleta Engineering
Santa Barbara, CA
Gryphon Sciences (now
Gryphon Therapeutics, Inc.)
South San Francisco, CA
Hewlett-Packard
Palo Alto, CA
Hewlett-Packard Company
Laboratories
Palo Alto, CA
Hitachi Chemical Research
Center
Irvine, CA
Honda Research and
Development Americas, Inc.
Mountain View, CA
HRL Laboratories, LLC
Malibu, CA
Hughes Network Systems
Mission Viejo, CA
Hyseq, Inc. (now Nuvelo, Inc.)
Sunnyvale, CA
I/O Software, Incorporated
Riverside, CA
IBM’s Almaden Research Center
San Jose, CA
IdeaEDGE Ventures
San Diego, CA
IDEC Pharmaceuticals
Corporation
San Diego, CA
Immusol, Inc.
San Diego, CA
ImmvaRx
Sacramento, CA
IMPCO Technologies
Cerritos, CA
Integrated Photonics
Technology (IPITEK)
Carlsbad, CA
Intel Corporation
Santa Clara, CA and Hillsboro, OR
Intelligent Epitaxy
Technology, Inc.
Richardson, TX
Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems
Sunnyvale, CA
International Business
Machines (IBM) Corporation
San Jose, CA and Armonk, NY
International Copper
Association, Ltd. (ICA)
New York, NY
International Technology
Works
Bellflower , CA
Internet Pictures
Corporation (iPIX)
San Ramon, CA
Intersil Corporation
Milpitas, CA
Interval Research Corporation
Palo Alto, CA
Invitrogen, Inc.
Carlsbad, CA
Ion Diagnostics
Menlo Park, CA
IPC - The Hospitalist Company
North Hollywood, CA
Irvine Sensors Corporation
Costa Mesa, CA
ISG Technologies (now Cedara
Software Corporation)
Los Gatos, CA
ISIS Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Carlsbad, CA
IST International (Internet
Solution Technology)
Aliso Viejo, CA
iTerra Communications
Fremont, CA
JEM America Corporation
Fremont, CA
Kadmus Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Irvine, CA
Karo Bio AB
Sweden
KDDI Research and
Development Laboratories
Palo Alto, CA
KineMed, LLC
Piedmont, CA
Kinexis, Inc.
San Diego, CA
KLA-Tencor Corporation
San Jose, CA
KOSAN Biosciences, Inc.
Hayward, CA
Kyocera DDI Inst of Future
Telecom.s (KDI)
San Diego, CA
Lallemand, Inc.
Montreal, QC
Lam Research Corporation
Fremont, CA
LG Biomedical Institute
La Jolla, CA
Lilly Research Laboratories
Indianapolis, IN
Litmas, Inc.
Kensington, CA
Lotus Interworks, Inc.
Santa Monica, CA
Lucent Technologies Bell
Laboratories
Santa Clara, CA
Magnetic Diagnostics, Inc.
Venice, CA
MandalMed, Inc.
San Francisco, CA
MASA, Inc.
Washington, DC
Mattson Technology, Inc.
Fremont, CA
Maxim Integrated Products
Sunnyvale, CA
Maxwell Sensors Inc.
Santa Fe Springs, CA
Maxygen, Inc.
Redwood City, CA
Medarex
Milpitas, CA
Medconx, Inc.
Mountain View, CA
Medical Technology
Transfer Corp.
Los Angeles, CA
Appendix B: IUCRP UC Discovery Grant
Participating Sponsor Companies

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Mendel Biotechnology
Hayward, CA
MetroLaser, Inc.
Irvine, CA
Meyer Sound Labs
Berkeley, CA
Microsoft
Mountain View, CA and
Redmond, WA
Microtek Lab, Inc.
Carson, CA
MitoKor
San Diego, CA
Mitsubishi Chemical Research
and Innovation Center, Inc.
(MC-RIC)
Mountain View, CA
MMCOMM, Inc.
Torrance, CA
Molecular Applications Group
Palo Alto, CA
Monsanto - Calgene Campus
Davis, CA
Monsanto Company
St. Louis, MO
Moog Inc.
Mission Viejo, CA
More Technologies
Beverly Hills, CA
MorphoGen Pharmaceuticals
Inc.
San Diego, CA
Motorola
Monterey, CA and Schaumburg, IL
Myelos Neurosciences Corp.
(now Myelos Corporation )
San Diego, CA
Mytitek Inc.
Davis, CA
Nanometrics Incorporated
Milpitas, CA
Nanomix, Inc.
Emeryville, CA
National Semiconductor
Santa Clara, CA
NeoGene Technologies, Inc.
Irvine, CA
NeoTherapeutics Inc. (now
Spectrum Pharmaceuticals)
Irvine, CA
Nereus Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
San Diego, CA
Network Device, Inc.
Sunnyvale, CA
Neurogenetics, Inc
San Diego, CA
New Focus, Inc.
San Jose, CA
NexGen Research Corporation
Garden Grove, CA
Nikon Research Corp. of
America
Belmont, CA
Nissan Design America
San Diego, CA
Nokia Mobile Phones, Inc.
San Diego, CA
Nokia Research Center
Mountain View, CA
Nortel Networks Corporation
Santa Clara, CA
Northrop Grumman
Los Angeles, CA
Novartis Agricultural Discovery
Institute (NADI)
San Diego, CA
Novartis Crop Protection (now
Syngenta Crop Protection)
Research Triangle, NC
Novellus Systems
San Jose, CA
Novo Nordisk Biotech, Inc.
(now Novozymes Biotech, Inc.)
Davis, CA
Novocell, Inc.
Irvine, CA
Novozymes Biotech, Inc.
Davis, CA
Numerical Technologies, Inc.
San Jose, CA
Nuvasive Inc.
San Diego, CA
Olicon Imaging Systems,
Incorporated
Aliso Viejo, CA
One Cosmos Network
Palo Alto, CA
One Lambda, Inc.
Canoga Park, CA
Onsite Power Systems, Inc.
Camarillo, CA
Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Richmond, CA
Opcode Systems, Inc.
Mountain View, CA
Oplink Communications, Inc.
San Jose, CA
Oriol, Inc.
Santa Clara, CA
OzTech Systems, Inc.
Burlingame, CA
Pacific Fuel Cell Corp.
Tustin, CA
Pangene Corporation
Fremont, CA
PE Applied Biosystems, Inc.
(now Applied Biosystems)
Foster City, CA
Peptidogenic
Research & Co., Inc.
Livermore, CA
PETNet Pharmaceuticals
Culver City, CA
Pfizer Global Research and
Development
San Diego, CA
Pharmix Corporation
Redwood Shores, CA
Photon Imaging, Inc
Northridge, CA
Physical Optics Corporation
Torrance, CA
Pivotal Machines, Inc
Cerritos, CA
Planet Biotechnology, Inc.
Mountain View, CA
Plant Biotics
Watsonville, CA
Powdermet Inc.
Sun Valley, CA
Prediction Sciences
La Jolla, CA
ProComm Enterprises
Santa Monica, CA
Protein Design Labs
Fremont, CA
Protein Pathways, Inc.
Woodland Hills, CA
QUALCOMM Incorporated
San Diego, CA
Quality Systems, Inc.
Irvine, CA
Appendix B: IUCRP UC Discovery Grant
Participating Sponsor Companies

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Sony Technology Center -
San Diego
San Diego, CA
Space Systems/Loral
Palo Alto, CA
Specialty Laboratories, Inc.
Santa Monica, CA
Spectrum Laboratories, Inc.
Rancho Dominguez, CA
Steag CVD Systems
San Jose, CA
StemSource, Inc.
Thousand Oaks, CA
STMicroelectronics, Inc.
San Diego, CA
StrataGent Lifesciences
Los Gatos, CA
Stratonics, Incorporated
Laguna Hills, CA
Sugen, Inc.
South San Francisco, CA
Sun Microsystems,
Incorporated
Palo Alto, CA
Superconductor Technologies
Santa Barbara, CA
Surfx Technologies LLC
Los Angeles, CA
SurroMed, Inc.
Mountain View, CA
SVT Associates, Inc.
Eden Prarie, MN
Sygen International
Berkeley, CA
Synopsys Inc.
Mountain View, CA
Syntro Research Laboratories
(now Syntro Schering-Plough)
San Diego, CA
Tata Consultancy Services
Riverside, CA
Telik, Inc.
Palo Alto, CA
Telios Pharmaceuticals,
Inc. (now Integra Corporate
Research Center (CRC))
San Diego, CA
SangStat Medical Corporation
Fremont, CA
Schering Plough Animal Health
Corp. Elkhorn RsrCtr
Elkhorn, NV
Science Applications
International Corp (SAIC)
San Diego, CA
Scios, Inc.
Sunnyvale, CA
Scott Laboratories, Inc.
Petaluma, CA
Seagate Technology, Recording
Media Group
Fremont, CA
Semco Laser Technology
Baldwin Park, CA
Seminis Vegetable Seeds (now
Seminis, Inc.)
Oxnard, CA
Sequana Therapeutics, Inc.
(now AXYS Pharmaceuticals)
La Jolla, CA
SEQUUS Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
(now ALZA Corporation)
Menlo Park, CA
SETI Institute
Mountain View, CA
Signal Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
(now Signal Research Division
of Celgene)
San Diego, CA
Silicon Graphics Inc. (SGI)
Mountain View, CA
Silicon Valley Group, Inc.
San Jose, CA
Simax Technologies, Inc.
Irvine, CA
Skyworks Solutions, Inc.
Newport Beach, CA
Social and Public Art Resource
Center (SPARC)
Venice, CA
Sony Electronics Incorporated
San Jose, CA
Sony Pictures Entertainment
Culver City, CA
R.W. Johnson Pharmaceutical
Research Institute (now John-
son & Johnson Pharmaceutical
Research and Development)
San Diego, CA
Rainbow Communications, Inc.
San Jose, CA
Raven Biotechnologies, Inc.
South San Francisco, CA
Raytheon Defense Systems
(now Raytheon Missile
Systems)
El Segundo, CA and Tucson, AZ
Raytheon Electronic Systems
El Segundo, CA
Raytheon Naval and Maritime
Integrated Systems
San Diego, CA
Raytheon Space and Airborne
Systems
El Segundo, CA
Remedyne Corporation
Santa Barbara, CA
Remergent, Inc.
San Mateo, CA
RF Integrated Corporation
Irvine, CA
Rigel Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
South San Francisco, CA
Robert Mondavi Corporation
Napa, CA
Roche Biosciences (now
Roche Palo Alto)
Palo Alto, CA
Roche Diagnostics
Berkeley, CA
Rockwell Science Center (now
Rockwell Scientific Company)
Thousand Oaks, CA
RZ Syntopical Technologies
Sacramento, CA
SafeCell Wireless, LLC (now
A.W. Technologies, LLC)
Beverly Hills, CA
Salmedix Inc
La Jolla, CA
Samsung
La Jolla, CA
Appendix B: IUCRP UC Discovery Grant
Participating Sponsor Companies

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TerraGenomics
Davis, CA
Texas Instruments Inc.
Tustin, CA
Texas Instruments Wireless
Center - San Diego
San Diego, CA
Texas Instruments, Inc.,
Storage Products Group
Tustin, CA
The Citrus Research Board
Visalia, CA
The Geosat Committee, Inc.
Carrollton, GA
The Immune Response
Corporation
Carlsbad, CA
The Planetary Society
Pasadena, CA
The Polymer Technology
Group, Inc.
Berkeley, CA
Thermaphore Sciences, Inc.
(now Carta Proteomics, Inc.)
San Mateo, CA
ThinKom Solutions, Inc.
Torrance, CA
Thuris, Inc.
Irvine, CA
Titan Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
South San Francisco, CA
Tokyo Electron America, Inc.
Santa Clara, CA
Triad Biotechnology (now
Triad Therapeutics)
San Diego, CA
Trimble Navigation Limited
Sunnyvale, CA
Trimedia Technologies, Inc.
Milpitas, CA
TRW Avionics Systems Division
San Diego, CA
TRW Space and Electronics
Group (now Northrop
Grumman Space Technology)
Redondo Beach, CA
TRW Telecommunication
Programs Division (now
Northrop Grumman
Space Technology
Telecommunications)
Redondo Beach, CA
Tularik, Inc.
South San Francisco, CA
United Devices
Berkeley, CA
Valent BioSciences
Corporation
Libertyville, IL
Varian, Inc.
Palo Alto, CA
Velocium
El Segundo, CA
Vitesse Semiconductor
Corporation
Camarillo, CA
Volkswagen Electronics
Research Lab - North
American Branch
Sunnyvale, CA
VSOM
San Jose, CA
Wacker Siltronic Corporation
San Jose, CA
Walnut Marketing Board
Sacramento, CA
Walsin Research and Product
Development, Inc.
Santa Barbara, CA
Warner Brothers
Burbank, CA
Western Digital Corporation
Lake Forest, CA
Windy Hill Technology, Inc.
(now Cytyc Health Corp.)
Menlo Park, CA
X-Ceptor Therapeutics
San Diego, CA
Xencor
Monrovia, CA
Xytronyx, Inc. (now Pacific
Pharmaceuticals, Inc.)
San Diego, CA
Y Media Corporation
Irvine, CA
Zymo Research Corp
Orange, CA
Zyomyx, Inc.
Hayward, CA
Appendix B: IUCRP UC Discovery Grant
Participating Sponsor Companies

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3Com
3M
ABB HAFO, Inc.
Abrizio, Inc.
Accelerated Processors
ACSI, Inc.
ACT Networks, Inc.
Actel Corporation
Adaptec, Inc.
ADE Corporation
Advance Model Development
Advanced Computer
Communications
Advanced CounterMeasure
Systems
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
Advanced Packaging Systems
Advanced Research and
Applications Corp.
Advanced Systems Technology
Advanced Technology Inc.
Aerojet
Aerojet ElectroSystems
Aerojet Solid Propulsion
Compamy
Aerojet TechSystems
Aesthetic Solutions, Inc.
AFC Company
Agilent Technologies, Inc.
Aguila Technologies, Inc.
AirTouch Communications
Alcatel Network Systems
Allied Signal, Inc.
Allied Telesyn International
Alpha Photonics, Inc.
ALPS Manufacturing (USA)
Alsi Systems
Alta Group of Cadence Design
Systems
Altera Corporation
Amada Software America
Amdahl Corporation
Amerasia Technology, Inc.
American High Voltage
American Turnkey
American Xtal Technology
AMI
AML Communications
AmmoCore Technology, Inc.
AMP, Inc.
Anadigics
Analog Devices, Inc.
Angeles Design Systems
Apple Computer, Inc.
Applied Magnetics Corporation
Applied Materials, Inc.
Applied Micro Circuits
Corporation
Applied Signal Technology, Inc.
Applied Solar Energy
Corporation
Aptix Corporation
ARACOR
Arcadia Design Systems, Inc.
Archer Systems, Inc.
ArcSys, Inc.
AreaNex Communications, Inc.
Argo Systems, Inc.
ARK Telecom
Asahi Chemical Industry
America, Inc.
Aspect Systems
AT&T Bell Laboratories
AST Research
AT&T Global Information
Systems
AT&T Labs-Research
Atmel Corporation
Auspex Systems, Inc.
Autodesk, Inc.
Avant! Corporation
Avantek, Inc.
Baxter Healthcare Corporation
Bay Networks, Inc.
Beckman Industrial
Corporation
Bede Scientific, Inc.
Bell Communications Research
Bell Northern Research
Bellcore
BellSouth Telecommunications
Beta Squared, Inc.
BIOSYM Technologies, Inc.
BizRate.com
BNR Northern Telecom
Boeing Electronics Company
Boeing North American, Inc.
Bondtronix, Inc.
Borland International
Branson International Plasma
Corporation
British Petroleum America Inc.
Broadcom Coporation
Burr-Brown Corporation
Cabletron Systems
Cadence Design Systems, Inc.
Cadence Spectrum Design
California Data Link
Call/Recall Corporation
CalTest Instruments, Inc.
Canon Information Systems
Canon USA, Inc.
Cascade Design Automation
Cascade Microtech, Inc.
Certicom
Cherokee International
Chips and Technologies, Inc.
CI Systems, Inc.
Cinebase Software
Cirrus Logic, Inc.
Cisco Systems, Inc.
Coherent, Inc.
Comdisco Systems, Inc.
Compaq Corporation
Compass Design Automation
Compression Laboratories, Inc.
Computer Motion, Inc.
Computervision, Inc.
COMSIDCO Systems, Inc.
Conductus
Conexant Systems, Inc.
Control Data Corporation
Control Optics
Cornerstone Imaging, Inc.
Cray Research, Inc.
Crystallume Company
Cylink Corporation
Cypress Semiconductor
Cyra Technologies, Inc.”
Daimler Benz
Daimler-Chrysler
Data General
DataPath Systems, Inc.
David Sarnoff Research Center
Deacon Research
Delco Electronics
Deloitte Haskins and Sells
Dexter Corporation
DHV International, Inc.
Dialogic Corporation
DigiRad
Digital Equipment Corporation
Digital Instruments, Inc.
Digital Sound Corporation
DK Technologies, Inc.
Dolby Laboratories, Inc.
Appendix B: MICRO
Participating Sponsor Companies

Page 34
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Page 33
Dolphin Interconnect Solutions,
Inc.
Domain Technology
Domino Lasers, Inc.
Douglas Aircraft Company
Dow Chemical USA
dQdt
DSP Group, Inc.
DSP Software Engineering, Inc.
DuPont Corporation
Eastman Kodak Company
Echo Speech Corporation
EDS Unigraphics Division
EEsof, Inc.
EG&G Measurements, Inc.
EG&G Reticon
EiC Corp.
Eigen
Electro Plasma, Inc.
Elite Microelectronics, Inc.
EMC Corporation
Energy Compression Research
Corporation
Enigmatics
Environmental Systems
Research Institute
Envision Medical Corporation
EPIC Design Technology, Inc.
Equator Technologies
Ericsson, Inc.
Ericsson-GE Mobile
Communications, Inc.
Esclade Corporation
ESL, Inc.
Everex Systems, Inc.
Exabyte Corporation
EXAR
Excelics Semiconductor, Inc.
Exemplar Logic, Inc.
Fairchild Semiconductor
Corporation
Fermionics Corporation
FMC Corporation
Folsom Research, Inc.
Ford Aerospace &
Communications Corp.
Ford Microelectronics, Inc.
Ford Motor Company
Fujant, Inc.
Fujitsu Laboratories of
America, Inc.
Fujitsu Microelectronics, Inc.
Fujitsu Network Transmission
Systems, Inc.
FX Palo Alto Laboratory, Inc.”
GEC Plessey Semiconductors,
Inc.
GenCorp Aerojet
Genentech, Inc.
General Dynamics Corporation
General Electric Company
General Electric Medical
Systems
General Electric/Intersil
General Instrument
Corporation
General Monitors
General Motors
Genesis Technologies
Geosonics, Inc.
GeoSpatial Technologies, Inc.
Global Communication
Semiconductors, Inc.
GlobeSpan, Inc.
GMF Robotics Corp.
Gore Photonic
GRANGER-TELETTRA, ELASIS
Grass Valley Group
GTE Government Systems
GTE Laboratories, Inc.
GTRAN
HAL Computer Systems
Harris Semiconductor
Corporation
Hayes Microcomputer
Products, Inc.
Hewlett-Packard Company
Hi-Z Technology, Inc.
Hitachi America, Ltd.
Hitachi Micro Systems, Inc.
Hitachi Semiconductor, Inc.
Honeywell, Inc.
Hoya Corporation USA
HOYA Optics, Inc.
HRL Laboratories, Inc.
HT Research, Inc.
Hughes Aircraft
Hughes Electronics Corporation
Hughes Network Systems
Hughes Space &
Communication
Hughes Spectrolab, Inc.
IBM Corporation
IC Solutions, Inc.
Illgen Simulation Technologies,
Inc.
Illustra Information
Technologies
Image-X
Impala Linear Corporation
Impco Technologies, Inc.
Imprimis Incorporated
IMT Inc.
Information Systems Labor
Informix Software, Inc.
Infotec Development Inc.
Ing. C. Olivetti & C., S.p.A.
INMOS Corporation
InnoVision Medical, Inc.
Integrated Device Technology,
Inc.
Integrated Information
Technology, Inc.
Integrated Micro Products
Integrated Sensor Solutions
Intel Corporation
Intelligence Ware, Inc.
Intelligent Fiber Optics Systems
Inter-Tel, Inc.
Interactive Development
Environment
Intergraph Corporation
International Microcircuits, Inc.
International Microelectronic
Products
Interstate Electronics
Corporation
Interval Research Corporation
Irvine Sensors Corporation
IsComp Systems, Inc.
ISORAY Corporation
J. L. Wood Optical Systems
Johnson Matthey Electronics
Karkar Electronics, Inc.
Karl Storz Imaging, Inc.
Kofax Image Products
Kopin Corporation
KTI Chemicals
Kumetrix, Inc.
Lam Research Corporation
Lawrence Semiconductor
Laboratories, Inc.
Lernout & Hauspie Speech
Products NV
Level One Communications,
Inc.
Appendix B: MICRO
Participating Sponsor Companies

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LG Electronics
Lightwave Link
Linear Technology Corp.
Linfinity Microelectronics
Litel Instruments, Inc.
Lockheed Missile and Space
Company, Inc.
Lockheed-Martin
Logicon Ultrasystem, Inc.
LogicVision, Inc.
Loomis Industries Inc.
Loral Aeronutronic Corporation
Loral Fairchild Imaging
Services
Loral Test and Information
Systems
Loral Western Development
Labs
Lord Corporation
LSI Logic Corporation
Lucent Technologies
Lumin, Inc.
Lytel, Inc.”
M/A-COM
Magnecomp Corporation
Martin Marietta
Marvell Semiconductors
MasPar Computer Corporation
Matsushita Electric Works
Mattson Technology, Inc.
Maxtor Corporation
Maxwell Laboratories, Inc.
MCC Corporation
McDonnell Douglas Corporation
Medio Systems
Mentor Graphics Corporation
Metalink
MetroLaser
Metrum Information Storage
Micro Laser System
Microelectronics Computer &
Technology Corporation
MICRON Technology
MicroNex Corporation
MicroSim Corporation
Microsoft Corporation
Microwave Applications Group
MicroWave Technology, Inc.
MIL 3, Inc.
Mitsubishi Electronic Research
Mitsubishi Electronics America,
Inc.
Mitsubishi Silicon America
Monkowski-Rhine, Inc.
Morton International, Inc.
Moseley Associates, Inc.
Motorola, Inc.
MSC Software Corporation
Multigen, Inc.
Nanotronics, Inc.
Nanovation Technologies, Inc.
National Semiconductor
Company
nCHIP, Inc.
NCR Corporation
NEC Electronics, Inc.
NEC USA, Inc.
NetRidium
Network Devices, Inc.
Neuron Data, Inc.
New Focus
New Focus, Inc.
Newport Corporation
Nokia Mobile Phones
Nokia Research Center
Nortel Networks
Nortel (Northern Telecom Ltd.)
Northrop Grumman
Corporation
Novell, Inc.
NSK Corporation
NTT America, Inc.
NurLogic Design, Inc.
Ohm Technologies
Olympus Corporation
Optivision Incorporated
Opto Link and
Communications, Inc.
OrCAD
Orincon Corporation
Osram Sylvania, Inc.”
Pacific Bell
Pacific Communications
Sciences, Inc.
PairGain Technologies, Inc.
Panasonic Semiconductor
Development Company
Panasonic Technologies, Inc.
PC Express
PCO Inc.
PDA Engineering
Perceptronics, Inc.
Peregrine Semiconductor
Corporation
Perkin-Elmer
Philips Research, Palo Alto
Philips Semiconductors
Phillips Medical Systems, Inc.
Phillips Ultrasound, Inc.
Photo Acoustic Technology, Inc.
Physical Optics Corporation
PiE Design Systems, Inc.
Pinnacle Imaging, Inc.
Plasma Materials Technologies,
Inc.
Plasma-Therm, Inc.
Plessey Semiconductors
PMC-Sierra, Inc.
Power Spectra
Precision Monolithics Inc.
PulsePoint Communications
QAD, Inc.
QSC Audio Products, Inc.
Qualcomm, Inc.
Quality Systems, Inc.
Quantum Corporation
Quantum Group, Inc.
Quickturn Design Systems, Inc.
Radius, Inc.
Raychem Corporation
Raytheon Missile Systems
Company
Raytheon Systems Company
RC Electronics
RDL Photonic Integrated Chip
Corporation
Read-Rite Corporation
Reasoning Systems, Inc.
Renaissance Microsystems
RF Systems
Ricoh Corporation
RMO Diagnostic Services
Roche Molecular Systems, Inc.
Rockwell CMC, Inc.
Rockwell International
Rosemount, Inc.
RSA Data Security, Inc.”
S-MOS Systems
Samsung Semiconductor, Inc.
Sandia National Laboratories
Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd.
SBC Technology Resource
Schlumberger Well Services
Science Applications
International Corp.
SCS
Seagate Technology
Seattle Silicon Inc.
Sematch
Appendix B: MICRO
Participating Sponsor Companies

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Semicoa Semiconductors
Semiconductor Research
Corporation
Sense8 Corporation
SenSym, Inc.
Sequent Computer Systems
Inc.
SGI/CRAY Research
SGS-Thomson Microelectronics
Sharp Corporation
Sharp Microelectronics
Technology, Inc.
Shipley Company, Inc.
Siemens Microelectronics, Inc.
Sierra Monolithics, Inc.
Sierra Semiconductor
Signal Processing Technologies
Signal Technology, Inc.
Signetics Corporation
Silicon Valley Group, Inc.
Silcon Graphics
Silcon Graphics Computer
Silcon Laboratories
Silicon Compilers
Silicon Graphics
Silicon Storage Technology, Inc.
Silicon Systems, Inc.
Silicon Valley Group. Inc.
Silicon Valley Research, Inc.
Silicon Video Corporation
Software and Technologies
Sonatech, Inc.
Sony Electronics, Inc.
Sony Microsystems Company
Space Computer Corporation
Space Electronics, Inc.
Sparta, Inc.
Spectra Diode Laboratories,
Inc.
Spectra-Physics Laser Data
Systems
Spectrolab, Inc.
Spectron Microsystems
Spider Systems, Inc.
Spire Corporation
Sprint
Sputtered Films Inc.
SRC
SRI International
Standard Micosystems
Corporation
Star Semiconductor
Corporation
Starlight Networks, Inc.
Statek Corporation
STMicroelectronics
Storage Technology
Corporation
StrataComm, Inc.
Sun Microsystems Laboratories,
Inc.
Superconductor Technologies,
Inc.
Superior Vacuum Technology
Surface/Interface, Inc.
SVG Thermco Systems
Switchcore Corporation
Symbios Logic
Symbol Technologies
Synopsys, Inc.
Taiyo Yuden (U.S.A.), Inc.
Tandem Computers, Inc.
Tata America, Inc.
Tata Consultancy Services
TDK Semiconductor Corp.
Technics, Inc.
Technology Modeling Assoc.
Inc.
Tecstar, Inc.
Tegal Corporation
Teknekron Communications
Systems, Inc.
Teknekron Software Systems,
Inc.
Tektronix, Inc.
Telcordia Technologies
Telebit Corporation
Telecommunications
Technology
Teledyne Controls
Teledyne Electronic
Technologies
Telesis Technologies
Laboratory
Telops Management, Inc.
Teradata Corporation
Texas Instruments, Inc.
The Aerospace Corporation
The Newport Corporation
Therma-Wave
Thermionics Laboratory, Inc.
TIR Technologies, Inc.
Togai InfraLogic, Inc.
Toranaga Technologies, Inc.
Toshiba America, Inc.
Touchstone Software
Corporation
Tracor
Trisys, Inc.
TRW, Inc.
Twin Sun, Inc.
Tyecin Systems, Inc.
Ultra Network Technologies
Unisys Corporation
Unisys PlusePoint
Communications
Unitec Research, Inc.
Universal Energy Systems, Inc.
UNOCAL Science and
Technology Center
US West Advanced
Technologies
UVC Corporation
Valid Logic Systems, Inc.
Vantis Corporation
Varian Associates, Inc.
Varian Ion Implant Systems
Veritas Software
Via Technologies, Inc.
ViaSat
Viewlogic Systems, Inc.
Virtual Computer Corporation
Visteon Automotive Systems
VLSI Technology, Inc.
VTC Inc.
Wacker Siltronic
WaveTracer, Inc.
Western Digital Corporation
Westinghouse Electric
Corporation
Wink Communications
Xerox Corporation
Xerox PARC
Xilinx, Inc.
Y Media
Z-World, Inc.
Zexel USA Corporation
ZK-Celltest, Inc.
ZYCAD Corporation
Appendix B: MICRO
Participating Sponsor Companies

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UC Berkeley
Bioengineering
Biostatistics
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering &
Computer Science
Industrial Engineering and
Operations Research
Materials Science & Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Molecular and Cell Biology
Music
Nutritional Sciences and
Toxicology
Plant and Microbial Biology
Cooperative Extension
Specialist
Public Health
School of Optometry
Space Sciences Lab
Vision Science
UC Davis
Animal Science
Applied Science
Biological and Agricultural
Engineering
Biological ChemistryCenter for
Comparative Medicine
Center for Image Processing
and Integrated Computing
Chemical Engineering and
Materials Science
Chemistry
College of Engineering
Computer Science
Department of Animal Science
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
Entomology
Environmental Plant Biology
Food Science and Technology
Human Pathology
Internal Medicine
Land, Air, and Water Resources
(LAWR)
Pharmacology
Physics and Astronomy
Physiology and Biophysics
Psychiatry and Human Behavior
UCLA
Biological Chemistry/
Jonsson Cancer Center
Center for Digital Innovation
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Chicano Studies
Computer Science
Computer Science Department
Dentistry
Electrical Engineering
Human Genetics
Material Science
Material Science & Engineering
Mathematics
Measurement and
Psychometrics
Medicine
Microbiology & Molecular
Genetics
Molecular and Medical
Pharmacology
Molecular Medicine/Biol.
Chemistry
Molecular, Cell &
Developmental Biology
Neurology
Neuropsychiatric Institute
Ortho Surg/Bio Chem
Pathology
Pathology & Laboratory
Medicine
Pediatric Cardiology
Pediatrics
Physics and Astronomy
Radiological Sciences
Radiology
Statistics
Surgery
Surgery/Neurosurgery
Urology
Medicine and Epidemiology
Nematology
Nutrition
Pathology (School of Medicine)
Pathology, Microbiology,
Immunology
(School of Veterinary Medicine)
Pediatrics
Plant Pathology
Pomology
Rheumatology, Allergy &
Clinical Immunology
Statistics
Textiles and Clothing
Vegetable Crops
Veterinary Medicine
Viticulture and Enology
UC Irvine
Anatomy and Neurobiology
Biological Chemistry
Biomedical Engineering
Chemical & Biochemical Engr. &
Materials Science
Chemical and Biochemical
Engineering
Chemical Engineering &
Materials Science
Chemistry
Civil and Envirnmental
Engineering
Cognitive Sciences
Developmental & Cell Biology
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
Information and Computer
Science
Integrated Nanosystems
Research Facility
Mechanical & Aerospace
Engineering
Medicine/Infectious Diseases
Microbiology & Molecular
Genetics
Molecular Biology &
Biochemistry
Neurobiology and Behavior
Pathology
Pediatrics
Appendix C: Participating Campus Departments and Centers

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UC Riverside
Botany and Plant Sciences
Chemical and Environmental
Engineering
Chemistry
College of Engineering, Center
for Environmental Research and
Technology
Computer Science and
Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Entomology
Genetics
Nematology
Plant Pathology
UC San Diego
Anesthesiology
Applied Mechanics and
Engineering Sciences
Bioengineering
Biology
Cancer Center
Cellular and Developmental
Biology
Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Chemical Engineering and
Material Science
Chemistry
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Cognitive Science
Computer Science and
Engineering
Electrical and Computer
Engineering
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
Family and Preventive Medicine
Institute for Neural
Computation
Institute on Aging
Marine Research Division,
Center for Marine
Biotechnology and Biomedicine
Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering
Medicine
Molecular Biology
Neurobiology
Pathology
Pediatrics
Physics/Institute for Nonlinear
Science
Psychiatry
Psychology
School of Biological Sciences
UC San Francisco
Anatomy/Cardiovascular
Research Institute
Anesthesia
Biochemistry and Biophysics
Biopharmaceutical Sciences
Cancer Research Institute
Cardiac Electrophysiology
Cardiovascular Research
Institute
Comprehensive Cancer Center
Epidemiology and
BiostatisticsFamily &
Community Medicine
Hematology/Oncology
Laboratory Medicine
Medicine
Medicine/Cardiology
Medicine/Endocrine
Medicine/Pediatrics
Metabolic Research Unit
Microbiology and Immunology
Neurological Surgery
Neurosurgery Research
Obstetrics, Gynecology &
Reproductive Sciences
Orthopaedic Surgery
Pathology
Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Radiology
Stomatology
Surgery
UC Santa Barbara
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Chemistry and Materials
Computer Science
Electrical & Computer
Engineering
Materials
Materials & Electrical &
Computer Engineering
Mechanical and Environmental
Engineering
Molecular, Cellular and
Developmental Biology
Music, Computing and
Technology
Neuroscience Research Institute
Physics & Materials
UC Santa Cruz
Chemistry and Biochemistry
College of Engineering
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
Film and Digital Media
Psychology
Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory
Environmental Engineering
Cell and Molecular Biology
Radiation Biology and
Environmental Toxicology
Accelerator and Fusion
Research Division
Lawrence Livermore National
Laboratory
Molecular and Structural
Biology Division
Appendix C: Participating Campus Departments and Centers

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Appendix D: Private Sponsor and PI - Co-PI Surveys